Thinking outside the Ice Cube

I’ve just posted a ‘reflections’ piece on the Ice Law Project blog, where I use the aims of the Ice Law Project to look back at testimony that I gave on Tuesday to the House of Lords Arctic Committee. In addition to interrogating the relationship between ice and politics, I consider some of the problems…

News

News

Things have been quite quiet on our blog for the last 4 weeks or so as some of us got a well earned break whilst our students are working on their summer dissertation projects. Alasdair Pinkerton (Alasdair has recently launched a No Man’s Land project with Durham Geographer and former colleague Noam Leshem, which he recently wrote … Continue reading

21st century diplomacy: Bridging the academic–foreign policy divide

On 29-30 July, a group of academics and foreign policy professionals will gather at Cumberland Lodge in Windsor Great Park with the aim of building productive dialogue, fostering mutually beneficial networks, establishing longstanding collaborations, and—ultimately—bridging the academic–foreign policy divide. The event, which is being organised by Dr Alasdair Pinkerton, is sponsored by a British Academy Early Career … Continue reading

Atlas of Inuit Arctic Trails

Atlas of Inuit Arctic Trails

  Michael Bravo (University of Cambridge) and colleagues including the anthropologist/geographer Claudio Aporta recently launched a new digital resource – a kind of interactive atlas – which brings together cultural knowledge about sea ice and the network of trails that allowed indigenous peoples to move, interact, trade and survive in the Canadian Arctic region. The … Continue reading

Light Discipline

Light Discipline

I’ve just finished writing the paper I’ll be presenting at the Sensing War conference in London tomorrow (12th June). The paper is called ‘The Meaning of Light: Seeing and Being on the Battlefield’, and is constructed around a poem I wrote about my experiences in Iraq in 2003. It’s quite an experimental format, so fingers … Continue reading